What trade agreements does Mexico have?

Mexico has an extensive network of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with 50 countries and is also a party to regional agreements within the framework of the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI).

Mexico has an extensive network of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with 50 countries and is also a party to regional agreements within the framework of the Latin American Integration Association (ALADI).

Mexico is a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the G-20, and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Mexico has 13 Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with 50 countries—including USMCA and FTAs with the European Union, European Free Trade Area, Japan, Israel, 10 countries in Latin America, and the 11-country Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. Mexico is also a member of the Pacific Alliance, a trade bloc formed by Mexico, Chile, Colombia, and Peru in 2011.

The main FTAs and trade agreements with Mexico are:

  • North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), soon to be replaced by the USMCA.
  • European Union-Mexico Free Trade Agreement, which is in the process of being modernized.
  • Comprehensive and Progressive Transpacific Partnership (CPTPP) in force between Australia, Canada, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, and Vietnam; Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, and Peru have not yet ratified the FTA.
  • Pacific Alliance with Colombia, Chile, and Peru.
  • FTA with Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.
  • FTA with the European Free Trade Association (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland).
  • FTA with Israel.
  • FTA with Uruguay.
  • FTA with Japan.